Welcome to the National Federation of the Blind of New Mexico

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About the NFB of New Mexico

In this section you will find:




What is the National Federation of the Blind?

"The real problem of blindness is not the loss of eyesight. The real problem is the misunderstanding and lack of information which exist. If a blind person has proper training and opportunity, blindness is only a physical nuisance."

The National Federation of the Blind is the largest organization of the blind in America. Interested sighted persons also join. Founded in 1940, the Federation has grown to include over 50,000 members.

It is estimated that over one million persons in the U.S. are blind and each year 50,000 more will become blind. Studies show that only AIDS and cancer are feared more than blindness. However, blindness need not be the tragedy which it is generally thought to be.

The National Federation of the Blind (NFB) is a consumer organization of blind people working together to improve opportunities for the blind and the understanding of blindness by the general public. The NFB has affiliates in all fifty states, in the District of Columbia, and in Puerto Rico, and over seven hundred local chapters in most major cities. There are currently more than fifty thousand members nationwide.



Our Purpose:

The purpose of the National Federation of the Blind is to act as a vehicle for collective self-expression by the blind. Since its beginning in 1940, the NFB has been working toward the ultimate goal of helping blind persons achieve self-confidence and self-respect, and the complete integration of the blind into society on a basis of equality. The National Federation of the Blind is doing this by providing public education about blindness, information and referral services, scholarships, literature and publications about blindness, aids and appliances and other adaptive equipment for the blind, advocacy services and protection of civil rights, employment assistance and support services, development and evaluation of technology, and support for blind persons and their families.



Live The Life You Want

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future. Every day we raise the expectations of blind people, because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams. You can live the life you want; blindness is not what holds you back.

The newly-blind person faces some difficult challenges. One of the best ways to meet these challenges is to meet other blind people and learn about the techniques they use. Membership in the NFB provides this common meeting ground and a sense of participation and restoration of confidence. Through speeches, pamphlets, and radio and TV appearances, members of the NFB work to educate the public that the blind are normal individuals who can compete on terms of equality.




A Distinctive Role

The Federation corresponds to blind people in the same way that labor unions correspond to workers, the Chamber of Commerce to business people, the American Bar Association to lawyers, the NAACP to blacks, the American Medical Association to doctors, and the Farm Bureau to farmers. It is a vehicle for joint action by the blind. In other words, the National Federation of the Blind is the voice of the blind. It is the blind speaking for themselves.




Who Represents the Blind?

There are numerous governmental agencies and private charitable organizations and foundations providing services for blind people, but only the blind themselves (acting through their own organization, the National Federation of the Blind) are able to speak for the blind. This is a basic concept of democracy. The government has a Department of Labor, but it cannot truly speak for workers. They speak for themselves. Likewise the Department of Agriculture does not replace farm organizations, nor do governmental agencies or private foundations take the place of democratic membership organizations of minority groups. This is true even if the agency or foundation is headed or largely staffed by members of the minority. As with others, so with the blind. More and more of the governmental agencies and private foundations are becoming responsive to the views and needs of the blind and are learning new concepts and attitudes about blindness. The future looks bright. There is an overwhelming feeling of goodwill and a wish to help on the part of the general public. Most important of all, the blind are moving forward to speak for themselves and take a hand in the management of their own affairs through their organization, the National Federation of the Blind.




You Can Help

The most important thing you can do is help us spread the new concepts about blindness. When you see our literature in the mail or meet one of us on the street, remember that we are people, just like you-with all the range of talents and capacities, wits and wants that you possess. You can also help by making cash contributions to our organization or remembering the National Federation of the Blind of New Mexico in your will. The National Federation of the Blind of New Mexico is principally supported by public contributions. Donations are tax-deductible.




NFB of New Mexico Officers and Board Members



Officers


Adelmo Vigil, President
Avigil74@gmail.com
575-921-5422

Veronica Smith, First Vice President Madison_tewe@spinn.net
505-892-3212

Daphne Mitchell, Second Vice President
Dmitchell777@bellsouth.net
505-890-8537

Tonia Trapp, Secretary Tonialeigh513@earthlink.net
505-856-5346

Curtis Chong, Treasurer curtischong@earthlink.net
505-508-1978


Board of Directors


Caroline Benavidez
Crounds1@msn.com
505-839-0909

Urja Lansing
urjalansing@q.com
505-345-3378

Alexia Harrison
switzerlawn@aol.com
505-859-5909

ShaRon Dandy
Sdandy51@msn.com
505-798-0192

Toby Chacon
tobychacon@yahoo.com
505-927-5747

Martin Gallegos
Pauline.gomezsfechap@gmail.com
505-920-7600




The Courtesy Rules of Blindness

When you meet me don't be ill at ease. It will help both of us if you remember these simple points of courtesy:
  • I'm an ordinary person, just blind. You don't need to raise your voice or address me as if I were a child. Don't ask my spouse what I want-"Cream in the coffee?"-ask me.
  • I may use a long white cane or a guide dog to walk independently; or I may ask to take your arm. Let me decide, and please don't grab my arm; let me take yours. I'll keep a half-step behind to anticipate curbs and steps.
  • I want to know who's in the room with me. Speak when you enter. Introduce me to the others. Include childen, and tell me if there's a cat or dog. The door to a room or cabinet or to a car left partially open is a hazard to me.
  • At dinner I will not have trouble with ordinary table skills.
  • Don't avoid words like "see." I use them, too. I'm always glad to see you.
  • I don't want pity. But don't talk about the "wonderful compensations" of blindness. My sense of smell, touch, or hearing did not improve when I became blind. I rely on them more and, therefore, may get more information through those senses than you do-that's all.
  • If I'm your houseguest, show me the bathroom, closet, dresser, window-the light switch, too. I like to know whether the lights are on.
  • I'll discuss blindness with you if you're curious, but it's an old story to me. I have as many other interests as you do.
  • Don't think of me as just a blind person. I'm just a person who happens to be blind.
  • In all 50 states, the law requires drivers to yield the right of way when they see my extended white cane. Only the blind may carry white canes. You see more blind persons today walking alone, not because there are more of us, but because we have learned to make our own way.

Chapter At Large

We have temporarily suspended the activities of our Chapter At Large, which is intended to provide a Federation chapter for those of our members who either have no chapter in their local area or are unable to attend meetings of a local chapter near them.

President Adelmo Vigil asks anyone who is interested in building the At Large Chapter to contact him, either by telephone or via email. Call 575-921-5422 or send email to avigil74@gmail.com.

Contact Information:

Adelmo Vigil, President
National Federation of the Blind of New Mexico
Alamogordo, NM
(575) 921-5422
E-Mail: avigil74@gmail.com

Make a Donation to the National Federation of the Blind of New Mexico

If you would like to make a charitable donation to the National Federation of the Blind of New Mexico, you can donate online through PayPal or contact our treasurer, Curtis Chong, at 505-508-1978.

Make the print yours!

The KNFB Reader is a mobile app that converts printed text into high quality speech to provide accurate, fast, and efficient access to both single and multiple page documents with the tap of a button. To purchase KNFB Reader, please visit http://www.nfb.org/knfbreader

Live The Life You Want:

The National Federation of the Blind of New Mexico knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future. Every day we raise the expectations of blind people, because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams. You can live the life you want; blindness is not what holds you back.